Tag Archives: decisions

human investment

human investment 

 

SUPER SEALS? “PROMISING SIGNS” FROM NAVY SPECOPS’ “BRAIN-STIMULATING TECHNOLOGIES”

At a conference near Washington, D.C., in February, Military.com’s Hope Hodge Seck reports that the commander of all Navy special operations units made an unusual request to industry: Develop and demonstrate technologies that offer “cognitive enhancement” capabilities to boost his elite forces’ mental and physical performance.

SOURCE: ZERO HEDGE 

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Vaguely reminiscent of having been alarumed 

“Whatever you’re training on as far as a movement-based skill,” he said, “if you do deep practice, hard repetition, this accelerates the benefit of that.”

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“… Dr. Dan Gould, founding co-editor of The Sports Psychologist and professor in exercise/sport science at the University of North Carolina in Greensboro, said at the Springfield conference:  

“Like wind sprints”, mind sprints “may not be appealing at first, but if you want to be good, you have to do them.”…”

in the preface to 

Summon The Magic: How To Use Your Mind to be a better Athlete (or anything else you want to be), June 2005  

 

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/5d/Minnesota_State_Capitol_Woodworkers_Toolbox_Historical_Society.jpg

How Coaching Works: A Five-minute animation 

As noted in the comments, the ending is incomplete:

the coachee is supposed to walk off into the sunset carrying a toolbox. 

Figure 1.1 on page 4 of Flaherty’s book on how to evoke excellence in others says the best results of having been coached are long-term excellence through self-generation and self-correction

Coaching, says author and coaching educator James Flaherty is freeing people to take action, to engage that transmission that links their engine to their wheels in a way that takes into consideration their immediate concerns, their comitments, their personal and cultural history, the future possibilitites, and their mood. 

“How many relationships, opportunities, and adventures have you neglected or ignored because you labeled yourself as a person who would or could not begin that relationship, opportunity or adventure?”  

This is deeply evocative of a writing prompt offered up by the author of The Butterfly Hours , the one about decisions you have made.

In my case, they were the decision not to go to Brussels and spend the summer with the European representative for Alcoa Aluminum and his daughter and their Mercedes-Benz, or the decision not to turn West and go to California in the summer of ’67 but to head back East and spend the summer earning tuition by chipping the cooled blobs of zinc off the steel I-beams for guard rails that were turned out in a factory in Everett, MA, or the decision not to go with the young lady who’d found a program in women’s studies at some state college in the Sacramento valley, or the decision not to accept an invitation to enroll in a highly-touted hotel and restaurant management program right there where I was.

I was my own coach then, but you can’t see yourself well when you’re only a year out of high school. 

 

“Are you ready to look deeply into your own self-characterizations that you have woven into a narrative that you protected with stories, justifications and excuses?” [page 65]

 

On Page 21 at the beginning of Chapter Two, Flaherty makes it very clear that coaching works from a deeply-grounded perspective that does not need to refer to psychology or use methodologies that will require you to divulge things you don’t want to divulge, or go into subjects where you are unwilling to venture

There are books and methods for going there if and when you are ready to do so; Alexander Lowen’s books on the body and bio-energetics are mentioned. There’s lots of reference to somatics which, along with mindfulness, developmental psychology, and interpersonal neurobiology, form the foundation for training in some coaching curricula. Flaherty’s book https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/90128.Coaching is loaded with suggested reading.

 

‘Command-and-control organizations canot bring about the conditions and competencies necessary to meet the challenges they face holistically because their entry-level premise is that a power and knowledge hieraarchy is the most effective way of structuring an organization’.  [page 2 of a book on how to evoke excellence in others]

 

Most people have a basic desire to contribute something of themselves; our tasks as members of our society is to begin how to help others achieve the competence to fully become themselves in a respectful, dignified and effective way.  In part, we do this by becoming competent at interaction. 

“Coaching isn’t telling people what to do; it’s giving them a chance to examine what they are doing in light of their intentions.”

“It’s only when someone tosses away the cookbook that he or she can become a truly great chef.”

from the preface of  https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/90128.Coaching

“It is extraordinarily difficult to observe and improve one’s own performance in the challenging roles people face in taking responsibility for the future…. 

A person can help other people develop new capabilities, new horizons, and new worlds of opportunity  to set aside ineffective and counter-productive habits and build new skills, practices, habits and platforms for collaborating in this ever-changing world.”

from the foreword of https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/90128.Coaching

 

We started this post with a glance at a request by a small organization that is at the very tip of the empire’s spear.  I’m not a militarist, and I’ve tended not to be violent; the last time I hit someone was 52 years ago. I have leaned toward the way of harmony of spirit; I got my first nudge down that path by reading a book by one of the premier coaches in the US, a contributor to The Art and Practice of Leadership Coaching

But maybe as we teach each other how to best hit the beaches on the continents of the opioid crisis, the infrastructure crisis, the systemic corruption crisis, or any of the other overlapping crises from politics and society to home and marriage 

“We need to really believe that investing in the human makes sense”.  So said the militarist whose goal is arguably the destruction of other humans.

 

The Three Core Coaching Skills (3:24) 

What is Integral Coaching and what does it offer?  Nine minutes by James Flaherty 

The Central Work of Our Lives

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JrEtQj66n7s 

[26 minutes]

The Four-Quadrant Model of Integral Coaching

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hR202omNxzM 

[42 minutes]

Building Your Inner Coach (17 minutes) 

Jim Loehr is a performance psychologist and author .